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Where do I start with learning the piano?

Perhaps you have been meaning to learn an instrument for a long period of time and have finally decided that the piano is the instrument for you. Good choice! So where do you go from here? Private lessons with a tutor are a great way to give you a kick start but there are other resources to help you along your way.

You can speed up your learning by accessing online sites which provide beginners piano lessons, many of which are free. Check out our reviews of Piano Nanny, Zebra Keys or our highest rated website resource Piano Marvel. Some sites start at the very beginning, offering lessons on how to read music, whilst others offer more advanced lessons which give you something to aim towards.

As the old saying goes, let’s start at the very beginning, a very good place to start. Ask yourself how much you actually know about music. Can you read music? Sit yourself down in front of a piano and take some time to familiarise yourself with the keyboard. The piano has 88 keys, white and black. The white keys are commonly known as naturals whilst the black notes are called accidentals, making a sharp of flat sound when they are pressed. There are seven natural keys and five accidental keys per octave. See, you are learning already.

If you listen to fellow pianists they will all have some well-meaning advice to give to you. So just to add to your long list or do’s and don’ts, we have compiled a quick list of five tips and tricks, just to confuse you even more.

  1. Play music you enjoy: Once you have mastered the basics, make practice more interesting by selecting music you really love.
  2. Scales: Practicing your scales will help engrain the 12 key signatures in your head.
  3. Don’t undervalue the theory. Although it can seem boring, it will help with your studies as you progress.
  4. If you are struggling with your timing invest in an electronic metronome.
  5. Whilst practice is important, it is also important to take a break. Learning a new instrument can be frustrating and if you start to feel unmotivated, you might be tempted to give up.

As there is no “Which” guide to buying a piano, we have noted a few simple things to consider. Think about your budget, keyboards can be a lot cheaper than a piano and don’t need tuning. They are also easier to store. If you decide to opt for a piano then start off with something reasonably priced, though be careful not to go too bargain basement as a poor quality instrument may not encourage you to practice and to keep on wanting to learn. Always make sure that the piano is tuned before you start practising. Take a look at our selection of Keyboards and Pianos through our store.

How much should you practice? How long is a piece of string? Research has revealed that the optimum amount of practice would be about 4 hours a day. Obviously in the real world this is nearing on an impossibility, unless perhaps you are intending to become a concert pianist. Ideally, new learners should be looking to dedicate 1-1.5 hours a day for practice. However rather than focus on how long you should practicing for, it can be really helpful to set goals for each lesson or group of lessons. One such goal may be to be able to play a particular piece of music.

Once these goals have been reached you can then move on to the next set of goals and so on.

Diana Krall

Diana Krall

Elton John

Elton John

Lang Lang

Lang Lang

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